mindblowingscience

"Probably no stars will physically hit each other. There’s just so much space between the stars, but when Andromeda collides with us it’ll have a huge impact on the Milky Way. Some things will get thrown into the black hole in the middle, some stars will get ripped off and thrown away into space, so it’ll be dramatic. And the entire night sky will change." - The Universe S1E9 Alien Galaxies

mindblowingscience
rhamphotheca:

Natural methane leakage from the seafloor is far more widespread on the U.S. Atlantic margin than previously thought. 
A new joint study identified methane plumes in the water column between Cape Hatteras, North Carolina and Georges Bank, Massachusetts. The methane plumes are emanating from at least 570 seafloor cold seeps, mostly on the upper continental slope. For more info see our news release: U.S. Geological Survey

rhamphotheca:

Natural methane leakage from the seafloor is far more widespread on the U.S. Atlantic margin than previously thought.

A new joint study identified methane plumes in the water column between Cape Hatteras, North Carolina and Georges Bank, Massachusetts. The methane plumes are emanating from at least 570 seafloor cold seeps, mostly on the upper continental slope.

For more info see our news release: U.S. Geological Survey

mindblowingscience
cenchempics:

COLD SNAP
When water condenses on a cold surface in the presence of dichloromethane (CH2Cl2) or certain other small gas-phase molecules, a type of caged complex called a clathrate can form. In ambient conditions such as at a laboratory bench, water becomes ice, forming tiny cages around the small molecules. The phenomenon is common when a researcher filters CH2Cl2 solutions (shown here):  The evaporating solvent simultaneously cools the filter paper and saturates the immediate surroundings with gaseous CH2Cl2.
Credit: Sophia Lai
Related C&EN Stories:
Mid-Atlantic Methane Mystery (will post 09/01/2014)

cenchempics:

COLD SNAP

When water condenses on a cold surface in the presence of dichloromethane (CH2Cl2) or certain other small gas-phase molecules, a type of caged complex called a clathrate can form. In ambient conditions such as at a laboratory bench, water becomes ice, forming tiny cages around the small molecules. The phenomenon is common when a researcher filters CH2Cl2 solutions (shown here):  The evaporating solvent simultaneously cools the filter paper and saturates the immediate surroundings with gaseous CH2Cl2.

Credit: Sophia Lai

Related C&EN Stories:

Mid-Atlantic Methane Mystery (will post 09/01/2014)